World Literature Program

World Literature II

WORLD LITERATURE PROGRAM | ENGLISH DEPARTMENT | CREIGHTON UNIVERSITY
 

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World Literature I
World Literature II

 

 

ENG/CNE 121/123: WORLD LITERATURE II

MASTER SYLLABUS

COURSE DESCRIPTION

A study of representative works of world literature from the seventeenth century to the present. The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of the Western and non-Western literary traditions, including women's, minority, and ethnic literature from around the world. An important goal of the class is to promote an understanding of the works in their cultural/historical contexts and of the enduring human values which unite the different literary traditions. The course's pedagogy gives special attention to critical thinking and writing within a framework of cultural diversity as well as comparative and interdisciplinary analysis.

TEXTS

Paul Davis, Gary Harrison et al., eds., The Bedford Anthology of World Literature, Package B (Volumes 4, 5, 6) (Bedford / St. Martins, 2003). ISBN 0–312–40482–4

Click here for Bedford Anthology Table of Contents

Click here to access the Bedford Anthology Support Website: World Literature Online

Click here to access Dr. Fajardo-Acosta's World Literature Website


SUMMARY OF POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

All faculty and students must adhere to the policies and requirements outlined in this syllabus as well as all directives and guidelines issued by the World Literature Program. In addition to the texts specified in this syllabus, instructors may teach other works. While instructors are free to determine the use of class time in their sections, it is strongly recommended that at least one week of class be spent on each of the major required works. In addition to discussion of the readings, the semester schedule allows for time to be used in a variety of ways including examinations, in-class essays, discussion of optional and additional readings, catch-up time, development of particular works or backgrounds, student presentations, film/video screenings, etc. All students in this course are required to write a minimum of 20 to 25 pages in the form of analytical papers, in-class essays, reflective journals, essay exams, etc. Students must also take a final examination including an outcomes-assessment essay question. The outcomes-assessment essay must account for at least 30% of the final exam grade; the exam question should ask students to develop a thesis connected to the readings, themes, and ideas discussed through the term (see "Guiding Themes, Methods, Approaches"). In addition to the final exam and required writing, students' grades should also take into account performance in work such as other exams, quizzes, writing exercises, class participation, extra-credit work, and attendance to class and out-of-class events. Instructors should ask all students to attend during the semester at least two out-of-class events such as relevant lectures, poetry/fiction readings, film/videotape screenings, plays, exhibits, or live performances. Instructors are free to choose which out-of-class events to require from their students; the World Literature Program will recommend appropriate events each term. Instructors should provide make-up options for students unable to attend particular events. Instructors choosing to teach texts not included in the anthology are responsible for ordering their own texts and desk copies. In every case of such orders, inexpensive editions must be chosen. Texts ordered in addition to the anthology should not exceed two in number.

READING REQUIREMENTS

All sections of the course must teach all of the prescribed texts in their entirety. The texts listed below constitute the common core of the course and should therefore be taught with care and thoroughness. At least one week of classes should be devoted to the discussion of the longer works, together with their respective historical, literary, cultural, and intellectual backgrounds.

In making selections from the sections below, instructors must strive to create a balanced reading list featuring a range of genres (epic, lyric, drama, short narrative, novel, essay); works from all the major historical periods (Neo-Classical/Enlightenment, Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, Postmodernism); works by authors from diverse backgrounds, genders, and racial/ethnic origins; and coverage of as many different cultures and literary traditions as possible. Whenever possible, instructors should attempt to go beyond the minimum requirements by including additional readings in their syllabi.

INSTRUCTORS MAY NOT USE THE SAME TEXT TO FULFILL THE REQUIREMENTS OF DIFFERENT CATEGORIES (I.E. NO DOUBLE-DIPPING)

SELECTIONS IN THE BEDFORD ANTHOLOGY MAY DIFFER FROM THOSE IN PREVIOUS ANTHOLOGIES. CHECK TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR AVAILABLE TEXTS

I. All of the following:

  • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust, Part I, or, a Romantic Texts Unit including at least five of the following authors (at least one of them must be a woman): Jean-Jacques Rousseau, William Blake, William Wordsworth, Percy Bysshe Shelley (not in the anthology), John Keats, Friedrich Hölderlin (not in the anthology), Emily Dickinson, Alphonse de Lamartine (not in the anthology), Heinrich Heine, Giacomo Leopardi (not in the anthology), Victor Hugo (not in the anthology), Dorothy Wordsworth (not in the anthology), Novalis (not in the anthology), Anna Bunina (not in the anthology), Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer (not in the anthology), Rosalía de Castro (not in the anthology). Additional Romantic authors included in the anthology: Coleridge, Gerard de Nerval, Lord Byron, Hoffmann, Pushkin
  • A nineteenth- or twentieth -century non-Western work of the instructor's choice
  • A woman author of the instructor's choice (17th-century to the present)
  • Samuel Beckett, Endgame (not in the anthology but it does contain "Krapp's Last Tape" ) or Luigi Pirandello's Six Characters in Search of an Author

II. Choose at least one of the following:

  • Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, "Reply to Sor Filotea de la Cruz," epistolary essay (not in Pack B of the anthology, some selections from Sor Juana available in Pack A, vol. 3 )
  • Marie de la Vergne de La Fayette, The Princess of Cleves (not in the anthology)
  • Dorothy Wordsworth, selections from The Grasmere Journals (not in the anthology)
  • Anna Bunina, poetry (not in the anthology)
  • Rosalía de Castro, poetry (not in the anthology)
  • Emily Dickinson, poetry
  • Higuchi Ichiyo, "Child's Play," short story ("Child's Play" not in the anthology but text includes "The Thirteenth Night")
  • Virginia Woolf, "An Unwritten Novel," short story (not in the anthology); selections from A Room of One's Own (anthology also includes "Three Pictures" and "The Fascination of the Pool")
  • Anna Akhmatova, "Requiem," poetry
  • Alfonsina Storni, poetry (not in the anthology)
  • Doris Lessing, "The Old Chief Mshlanga," short story (not in the anthology)
  • Marguerite Duras, Hiroshima Mon Amour, screenplay (not in the anthology)
  • Zhang Ailing (Eileen Chang), "Love in a Fallen City," short story (not in the anthology)
  • Clarice Lispector, "The Daydreams of a Drunk Woman," short story (not in the anthology)
  • Ingeborg Bachmann, "The Barking," short story (not in the anthology)
  • Alice Munro, "Walker Brothers Cowboy," short story (not in the anthology)
  • Lorna Goodison, poetry (not in the anthology)
  • Nawal El Saadawi, "In Camera," short story (not in the anthology)
  • Leslie Marmon Silko, "Yellow Woman," short story (not in the anthology, but contains "Lullaby")
  • Additional women writers featured in the anthology include: Aphra Behn, Mary Wortley Montagu, Mary Rowlandson, Marie Le Jars de Gournay, Olympe de Gouges, Mary Astell, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Shelley, George Eliot, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Emilia Pardo Bazán, Harriet Jacobs, Mary Prince, Rassundari Devi, Kate Chopin, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain, Nellie Sachs, Toni Morrison, Gwendolyn Brooks, Nadine Gordimer, Adrienne Rich, Bessie Head, Bharati Mukherjee, Takenishi Hiroko, Wislawa Szymborska, Fadwa Tuqan, Alifa Rifaat, Joy Harjo, Sandra Cisneros, Naomi Shihab Nye, Gish Jen, Edwige Danticat

III. Choose at least one of the following:

IV. Choose at least one of the following:

  • Asadulla Khan Ghalib, Ghazals, poetry
  • Rabindranath Tagore, "Punishment," short story (not in the anthology but includes the short stories"The Hungry Stones" and "Emancipation," the lecture "The Message of India to Japan," and the novella Broken Ties)
  • Premchand, "The Road to Salvation," short story (not in the anthology)
  • Mahasweta Devi, "Breastgiver," short story (not in the anthology)
  • Anita Desai, Clear Light of Day, novel or "The Rooftop Dwellers," short story (not in the anthology but includes "The Farewell Party" )
  • Evliya Çelebi, Book of Travels: The City of Boudonitza, prose narrative (not in pack B of the anthology but included in Pack A, book 3)
  • Tawfiq al-Hakim, The Sultan's Dilemma, play (not in the anthology but includes the play, The Fate of a Cockroach)
  • Nawal El Saadawi, "In Camera," short story (not in the anthology)
  • Additional writers/texts included in the anthology: Mirza Abu Taleb Khan, Ramprasad Sen, Syed Ahmed Khan, Rassundari Devi, Swami Vivekananda, Muhammad Iqbal, Mohandas Gandhi, Salman Rushdie, Raja Rao, R. K. Narayan, V. S. Naipaul, Mahmoud Darwish

V. Choose at least one of the following:

  • Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, autobiography (not in the anthology, but includes "Emancipation Proclamation")
  • Birago Diop, African Folktales ("The Humps," "The Bone," "Mother Crocodile") (not in the anthology)
  • Leopold Senghor, poetry
  • Richard Wright, "The Man Who was Almost a Man," short story (not in the anthology)
  • Ralph Ellison, "King of the Bingo Game," short story (not in the anthology)
  • Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart, novel
  • Aimé Césaire, poetry
  • Lorna Goodison, poetry (not in the anthology)
  • Derek Walcott, poetry
  • Wole Soyinka, Death and the King's Horseman, play (not in the anthology but includes "The Lion and the Jewel")
  • Additional writers/texts included in the anthology: Olaudah Equiano, African American Folk Songs, W. E. B. Du Bois, Martin Luther King, James Weldon Johnson, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Countee Cullen, Okot p'Bitek, James Baldwin, Jr., Chinweizu, Onwuchekma Jemie, Ihechukwu Madubuike, Felix Mnthali, Ngugi Wa Thiong'o

VI. Choose at least one of the following

  • Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, "Reply to Sor Filotea de la Cruz," epistolary essay (not in Pack B of the anthology but some materials from Sor Juana in Pack A, vol. 3 )
  • Rosalía de Castro, poetry (not in the anthology)
  • Alfonsina Storni, poetry (not in the anthology)
  • Rubén Dario, poetry (not in the anthology)
  • Clarice Lispector, "The Daydreams of a Drunk Woman," short story (not in the anthology)
  • Federico García Lorca, "Lament for Ignacio Sánchez Mejías," poetry
  • Pablo Neruda, poetry
  • Gabriel García Márquez, "Death Constant Beyond Love," short story (not in the anthology, but includes "A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings")
  • The Night Chant, Navajo sacred songs (not in the anthology)
  • Uke Iwagu Uo, "Geriguigatugo," Brazilian (Bororo) myth/story (not in the anthology)
  • Orpingalik, Uvlunuaq, Netsit, Uvavnuk, Kibkarjuk, Inuit Songs, Eskimo poetry (not in the anthology)
  • Zuni Ritual Poetry, Southwest Native American poetry (not in the anthology)
  • Andrew Peynetsa, "The Boy and the Deer," Southwest Native American (Zuni) tale (not in the anthology)
  • Leslie Marmon Silko, "Yellow Woman," short story (not in the anthology, "Lullaby" included )
  • Additional writers/texts included in the anthology: Gayanashagowa ("The Great Binding Law of the Iroquois Nation"), Black Elk, Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, Sherman Alexie, Martin Espada, Octavio Paz, Carlos Fuentes, Jimmy Santiago Baca

 

last updated: 08/01/2005

 
This page designed and maintained by Fidel Fajardo-Acosta, fajardo@creighton.edu